Beginning Spring Semester 2017 IDIES will hold a bi-monthly (every 2 months) seminar series. Typically we will hold two such seminars every academic semester. The talks will take place in the Mason Hall Auditorium (but occasionally in other rooms as available), typically on Thursdays 4pm-5pm, followed by a small informal reception.

For the Fall 2017 semester, if you have a suggestion for a distinguished speaker to visit and make a presentation on the broad topics of interest to IDIES, please contact Charles Meneveau at your earliest convenience.

Past Seminars

Heavy Hitters on Data Streams and Recent Variants

  • Where: Hodson Hall, Rm 210
  • When: October 04, 2017, 16:00
  • S. Muthukrishnan, PhD, Rutgers University
  • An IDIES Bi-Monthly Seminar

Please join us at 4:00 pm on Wednesday, Oct 4, 2017 for “Heavy Hitters on Data Streams and Recent Variants” by Dr. S Muthukrishnan, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and ACM Fellow at Rutgers University. The talk will take place on Wednesday, October 4th, 2017, from 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm in Hodson Hall, Room … Continued

The Nexus of Data Science, Convergence, and Graduate Education

  • Where: Arellano Theater, Levering Hall
  • When: April 13, 2017, 16:30
  • Dr. Dean Evasius
  • An IDIES Bi-Monthly Seminar

Abstract: Data science has emerged as a distinct discipline that has also become a power enabler of science and engineering. In its deep interactions with other disciplines it is an example of the scientific convergence, which is one of the Ten Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments. The rapid growth of data science raises deep … Continued

Geometric Methods for the Approximation of High-dimensional Dynamical Systems

  • Where: Mason Hall Auditorium
  • When: February 23, 2017 to February 23, 2017, 16:00
  • Mauro Maggioni
  • An IDIES Bi-Monthly Seminar

Abstract: We discuss a geometry-based statistical learning framework for performing model reduction and modeling of stochastic high-dimensional dynamical systems. We consider two complementary settings. In the first one, we are given long trajectories of a system, e.g. from molecular dynamics, and we discuss new techniques for estimating, in a robust fashion, an effective number of … Continued