Sanjay Padhi, PhD

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Amazon Web Services Research Initiatives.

Dr. Sanjay Padhi, leads the AWS Research Initiatives including AWS’s federal initiatives with the National Science Foundation. Dr. Padhi has more than 15 years of experience in large‐scale distributed computing, Data Analytics and Machine Learning. He is the co‐creator Workload Management System, currently used for all the data processing and simulations activities by CMS, one of the largest experiments in the world at CERN, consisting of more than 180 institutions across 40 countries. He also co‐founded the ZEUS Computing Grid project at Deutsches Elektronen‐Synchrotron (DESY), Germany before joining CERN. Sanjay obtained his Ph.D from McGill University in High Energy Physics and is also currently appointed by the Dean of Faculty as an Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics at Brown University.

Tony Hey, PhD

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Chief Data Scientist, Science & Technology Facilities, UK.

Tony Hey began his career as a theoretical physicist with a doctorate in particle physics from the University of Oxford in the UK. After a career in physics that included research positions at Caltech and CERN, and a professorship at the University of Southampton in England, he became interested in parallel computing and moved into computer science. In the 1980’s he was one of the pioneers of distributed memory message-passing computing and co-wrote the first draft of the successful MPI message-passing standard. After being both Head of Department and Dean of Engineering at Southampton, Tony Hey escaped to lead the U.K.’s ground-breaking ‘eScience’ initiative in 2001. He recognized the importance of Big Data for science and wrote one of the first papers on the ‘Data Deluge’ in 2003. He joined Microsoft in 2005 as a Vice President and was responsible for Microsoft’s global university research engagements. He worked with Jim Gray and his multidisciplinary eScience research group and edited a tribute to Jim called ‘The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery.’ Hey left Microsoft in 2014 and spent a year as a Senior Data Science Fellow at the eScience Institute at the University of Washington. He returned to the UK in November 2015 and is now Chief Data Scientist at the Science and Technology Facilities Council. In 1987 Tony Hey was asked by Caltech Nobel physicist Richard Feynman to write up his ‘Lectures on Computation’. This covered such unconventional topics as the thermodynamics of computing as well as an outline for a quantum computer. Feynman’s introduction to the workings of a computer in terms of the actions of a ‘dumb file clerk’ was the inspiration for Tony Hey’s attempt to write a popular book about computer science: ‘The Computing Universe: A Journey through a Revolution’.

S. Alexander Szalay, PhD

Director of IDIES, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Professor of Astrophysics & Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, IDIES, Department of Astrophysics & Computer Science.

Professor Szalay is the founding director of IDIES, a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Alumni Centennial Professor of Astronomy, and a professor of Computer Science. As a cosmologist, he works on the use of big data in advancing scientists’ understanding of astronomy, physical sciences, and life sciences.

Rajat Mittal, PhD

Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University.

Professor Mittal's research interests include computational fluid dynamics, low Reynolds number aerodynamics, biomedical flows, active flow control, LES/DNS, Immersed Boundary Methods, fluid dynamics of locomotion (swimming and flying), biomimetics and bioinspired engineering, and turbomachinery flows.

Elana. J Fertig, PhD

Department of Oncology, School of Medicine.

The Fertig Lab pursues research in the systems biology of cancer and therapeutic response. Her group develops computational methods for pattern detection from genomics data. Elana and her group develop bioinformatics tools that integrate pathway structure in pattern detection algorithms for gene expression data.

Margie Gier

Senior Administrative Manager, Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science.

Sarah Preheim, PhD

Department of Environmental Health & Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Preheim researches the ecology of microorganisms impacting water quality in lakes, estuaries and coastal oceans to better inform remediation strategies. She uses a combination of field sampling, laboratory experiments and computational analysis to improve our understanding of the microbial processes that impact water quality.

Jaime Combariza, PhD

Director, Maryland Advanced Research Computing Center.

Jaime Combariza is the director of the Maryland Advanced Research Computing Center, a shared computing facility of the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University. MARCC is funded by a State of Maryland grant to Johns Hopkins through IDIES.

Sahan Savas Karatasli, PhD

Assistant Research Scientist, .

Sahan Savas Karatasli is an Assistant Research Scientist and Lecturer at the Department of Sociology and the Arrighi Center for Global Studies at the Johns Hopkins University. His work examines dynamics of social movements, nationalism and historical capitalism from a long historical and global perspective.

S. Alexander Szalay, PhD

Director of IDIES, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Professor of Astrophysics & Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, IDIES, Department of Astrophysics & Computer Science.

Professor Szalay is the founding director of IDIES, a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Alumni Centennial Professor of Astronomy, and a professor of Computer Science. As a cosmologist, he works on the use of big data in advancing scientists’ understanding of astronomy, physical sciences, and life sciences.

David Elbert

Associate Research Scientist, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences.

David is an environmental geochemist and mineralogist with broad expertise. He’s recently worked on methodology development for electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray, and neutron scattering applications to toxic-metal, crystal chemistry.

Alan Yuille, PhD

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Yuille is a mathematician and computer scientist interested in the biology of vision. His research spans several disciplines including computer vision, vision science, and neuroscience. Alan Yuille received a BA degree in mathematics from the University of Cambridge in 1976. His PhD on theoretical physics, supervised by Prof. S.W. Hawking, was approved in 1981. He was a research scientist in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MI T and the Division of Applied Sciences at Harvard University from 1982 to 1988. He served as an assistant and associate professor at Harvard until 1996. He was a senior research scientist at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute from 1996 to 2002. He joined the University of California, Los Angeles, as a full professor with joint appointments in computer science, psychiatry, and psychology. He moved to Johns Hopkins University in January 2016 where he was appointed a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Cognitive Science and Computer Science. His research interests include computational models of vision, mathematical models of cognition, medical image analysis, and artificial intelligence and neural networks. He directs the research group on Computational Cognition, Vision, and Learning (CCVL). He is affiliated with the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines, and the NSF Expedition in Computing, Visual Cortex on Silicon.